Imagine

Imagine

The Simpsons - Dohs

The Simpsons - Dohs

Dune without words

Dune without words

Pulp Fiction

Pulp Fiction

Buttons and Doors

Buttons and Doors

O'Reilly Flips Out

O'Reilly Flips Out

Battlestar Galactica

Battlestar Galactica

Mad Men: Set me free

Mad Men: Set me free

Cutup

Similar to a Cutdown, a Cutup tends to reference a single work, such as a specific movie which is a defining difference from that of a Supercut which may draw elements from several different movies or shows. That said, it is common to see the notion of a "single work" defined as a TV series, rather than one particular episode.  Unlike a cutdown, a cutup rejects the goal of preserving the original story arc and instead aims to alter the narrative and introduce new and frequently subversive meanings not found in the original work.

The various speeches of President George W. Bush were almost instantaneously posted to YouTube but edited to make his statements mean something different from what he intended: “We proudly . . . torture anyone . . . who . . . gets in our way.” One of the most famous clips is titled Imagine and uses cutup words from the various Bush speeches to exactly produce a beautifully executed lyric vocalization atop the Beatles song Imagine mashed together with Walk on the Wild Side by Lou Reed. This particular example also crosses over into a Dubtitling definition as well.

notable example of the practice known as theme repetition is  Previously on Lost: What? consisting exclusively of all the words “what” cut together time and time again from the Lost TV series seasons 1, 2, and 3. The author Chris Zabriskie a composer and musician living and working in Orlando, Florida shares his technique: “Just find the (show) transcripts online, find the “what?”, scan to it, rip it, repeat. More tedious than time consuming." 

Cutups frequently use very specific theme repetition such as the official Hulu short containing only the Doh's from The Simpsons, or quiet moments such as Dune without words from the movie of the same name, or in contrast, just the cussing  from Pulp Fiction as well as sanctioned efforts such as the official DVD extra Buttons and Doors from Pixar's The Incredibles DVD or the darker collection of all the drug visuals found in  Requiem Montage  from the gritty 2000 movie Requiem for a Dream.

 A predominant and popular YouTubian trend is to combine this cutup derivative technique with dance remix instrumental tracks. The sound-bite vocals are typically derived from popular or controversial celebrities, such as Bill O’Reilly or sanctioned works such as Mister Rogers Remixed | The Garden of Your Mind  and Mad Men: Set me free  which employs cuts from the various Mad Men episodes to create the vocal track behind You keep me hanging on popularized by Diana Ross and later, the Vanilla Fudge.

Alaska Senator Ted Stevens’ famous description of the web as “not something that you just dump something on. It’s not a big truck. It’s a series of tubes,” was almost immediately popularized as a techno remix dance song on YouTube with more than 4.5 million views, likely the most visible moment of his entire career.

Frequently cutups act as collections of similar moments such as audio dialogue samples from popular television shows like All the FRAKS from Battlestar Galactica, or more esoteric and odd cutups such as all the non-dialog moments from the movie His Girl Friday in the clip His Girl Friday - Between The Lines Edit (2005)  a shortened version of the 1940 classic in chronological order starring Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell and produced by Valentin Spirik. While this might be considered a cutdown, in that the boy-meets-girl, boy-looses-girl, boy-gets-girl-in-the-end macro narrative of the original story arc is obvious, the actual saga in all its complexities, characters and subtlety is next to impossible to follow, so in my definition it falles into more of a cutup definition rather than a cutdown definition, but this level of scrutiny may be too abstract to ultimately worry about.

 



 

Back to Cutdowns

Back to Cutdowns

 
On to Detournement

On to Detournement